A Bargain or a Hook?

Everyone loves a bargain! A word of caution, many bargains are not really bargains but just clever advertising. Some examples:

  • “Buy this and receive a gift!” Cosmetic companies are really good at this one. “Purchase $55 or more on cosmetics and receive a free gift bag.” You really like their foundation for $39.50 and you find yourself looking for something else you might use just to get that cute gift.
  • “It pays to stock up! Earn a $10 gift card every time you buy $50 in participating stocking spree items.” Example items – 12 mega or 24 double rolls package of paper towels, buy 2 family size cookies, buy 2 bottle of dressing etc. But wait, I’ve only spent $23. What else can I buy? You end up buying items you don’t really need and don’t have adequate space to store just for a $10 gift card.
  • “Free shipping when you buy $75 or more!” You love that blue blouse. It costs about $49. Standard shipping/processing charges will add $11.99. You find yourself leafing through the catalogue looking for something $26 or more. You end up ordering some socks or underwear that you really don’t need to save on the shipping.
  • “Everything a dollar!” What a deal! Or is it? Many times big-box retailers can actually be a better buy in quality and price.
  • “Winter sale! Everything 50% off!” A couple of things here. Those same items were probably marked up for the holidays and 50% off of something you don’t need or love is not $75 dollars saved but $75 spent for something that will just sit on your shelf or hang in your closet.
Am I telling you to never grab that bargain? Of course not. You should shop a bargain when it is something you really need, love, and have a place to put it away. Just know what you are doing and why.

Jonda S. Beattie

Professional Organizer

Impulse Spending Leads to Clutter

You need a pair of shorts. Off you go to your favorite store. You find the shorts and a top that will look great with them. If you buy three tops you will get a better price. The necklace laid out with one of the tops would just finish the outfit. On the way out, you see a pair of sandals you like. They fit perfectly and look nice too. Man, if the shoe fits you’d better stock up. You buy the sandals in five colors.

When you get home and try to squeeze your purchases into your drawers and closet, you notice you have quite a few tops in the drawer with tags still on them.

You want a new shade of lipstick. Your favorite brand is having a sale. If you spend an additional $10, you get this lovely cosmetic bag filled with free samples. So you buy two lipsticks and get the “free” bag. Lovely! This is not such a terrible thing, until you put your bag in your bathroom closet and notice you have about 10 other bags in there – mostly full- of previous “free” gifts.

You go to the grocery store. You have a coupon that will give you $2.00 off if you buy 10 cans of soup. You also buy one bag of salad and get the next one free and there is a package of 25 rolls of toilet paper that looks like such a bargain.

Are we getting the idea? Don’t buy what you don’t need or love. Free is not always a bargain. Buying something you don’t need at a reduced price is not a bargain. Foods that you stockpile will crowd your space and may expire or spoil before they are used. This is not a bargain.

Having space to put your purchases away without overcrowding allows you to keep an inventory of what you have. It also prevents waste and buying items because you have lost track of what you already have.

Don’t buy items unless you know how you’re going to use them and where you are going to store them.. Impulse spending leads to disorganization and clutter, not to mention a strain on your budget.

Think before buying that next great deal!

Jonda S. Beattie

Professional Organizer

Less Stuff = More Money


Money, Honey! It’s that simple.

How does less stuff equate to more money?

First, know that every time you buy something you do not need or love, you are throwing away your money. Getting control of impulse buying can certainly save you money.

Next, if you have bought things you no longer need or love, don’t pay money to store them just to keep them out of your space. One in ten U.S. households rents a storage unit. It’s the fastest growing real estate segment over the last 35 years.

Last, you may be able to retrieve some money by consigning or selling items. The average woman has 27 pairs of shoes; the average man has 12. Men and women have on average 88 articles of clothing each. Of these clothing items, 25% are typically unworn. Clark Howard in today’s AJC talks about getting rid of stuff that you no longer use and making a profit. For clothing he suggests consignment stores, for furniture he suggests Craig’s list, and for antiques he suggests eBay.

There is an estimated $15 billion in unused tech gadgets in junk drawers worldwide according to IKEA. Clark Howard suggests the following sites for getting rid of electronics.

  • Glyde.com for gadgets and games
  • Gazelle.com for Apple products, plus Android, Blackberry and other phones
  • Gizmogul.com for selling old phones for cash and donating to charity at the same time
  • NewtonsHead.com for Apple products, even damaged iPhones
  • BuyBackWorld.com or BuyMyTronics.com for all electronics
  • NextWorth.com for phones, camera, tablets, and games
  • Swappa.com for Android devices

If you don’t want to go to the bother of selling your items, you can also donate and get a tax write off.

Not only will you make money by getting rid of your excess “stuff”, you will also feel so much lighter. Enjoy that extra space!

Jonda S. Beattie

Professional Organizer

Impulse Spending = Clutter

You need some face powder. Your favorite brand is having a sale. You spend so much (about $10 more than the face powder) and you get this lovely cosmetic bag filled with free samples. You think – “I could use another lipstick.”- so off you go happily to the cosmetic section of your favorite store. Now, you have your powder, a lipstick you don’t need, and a bag with cosmetics that were not on your needs list. Hmmm. That is not a terrible thing, until you put your bag in your bathroom closet and notice that you have about 10 other bags there – mostly full – of previous “free” gifts.

You go to your favorite clothing store. They are having a sale. If you buy two shirts the next one is free or 1/2 off the regular price. Lovely! You bring the shirts home and try to squeeze them into your closet. You notice that you have quite a few shirts already in the closet with tags still on them. Oh, and you found a pair of shoes that fit you perfectly and were soooo cute. So you bought them in 5 colors.

You go to the grocery store. You have a coupon that will give you $1.00 off if you buy 10 cans of soup. You can also buy one bag of salad and get the next one free and there is a package of 25 rolls of toilet paper that looks like such a bargain!

Are we getting the picture here? Don’t buy what you don’t need or love.

Don’t stockpile foods that you don’t have room to store or that will pass its expiration date before you use the items. Having enough space to put your purchases away without crowding allows you to keep an inventory of what you have. It will also prevent waste and buying items because you have lost track of what you already have in stock.

Don’t buy items unless you know how you’re are going to use them and where you are going to put them. Impulse spending leads to disorganization and clutter, not to mention a strain on your pocketbook.

Think before buying that next great item.

Jonda S. Beattie

Professional Organizer