A Bargain or a Hook?

Everyone loves a bargain! A word of caution, many bargains are not really bargains but just clever advertising. Some examples:

  • “Buy this and receive a gift!” Cosmetic companies are really good at this one. “Purchase $55 or more on cosmetics and receive a free gift bag.” You really like their foundation for $39.50 and you find yourself looking for something else you might use just to get that cute gift.
  • “It pays to stock up! Earn a $10 gift card every time you buy $50 in participating stocking spree items.” Example items – 12 mega or 24 double rolls package of paper towels, buy 2 family size cookies, buy 2 bottle of dressing etc. But wait, I’ve only spent $23. What else can I buy? You end up buying items you don’t really need and don’t have adequate space to store just for a $10 gift card.
  • “Free shipping when you buy $75 or more!” You love that blue blouse. It costs about $49. Standard shipping/processing charges will add $11.99. You find yourself leafing through the catalogue looking for something $26 or more. You end up ordering some socks or underwear that you really don’t need to save on the shipping.
  • “Everything a dollar!” What a deal! Or is it? Many times big-box retailers can actually be a better buy in quality and price.
  • “Winter sale! Everything 50% off!” A couple of things here. Those same items were probably marked up for the holidays and 50% off of something you don’t need or love is not $75 dollars saved but $75 spent for something that will just sit on your shelf or hang in your closet.
Am I telling you to never grab that bargain? Of course not. You should shop a bargain when it is something you really need, love, and have a place to put it away. Just know what you are doing and why.

Jonda S. Beattie

Professional Organizer

Pantry Organization

This time of year is great for organizing the pantry. It gives you a chance to organize your food items to see what is on hand for the increased amount of cooking that comes with the holidays. The purging of unneeded items as well as organizing what you are keeping will open up space for the extra items you bring in for special holiday dishes.

It doesn’t matter if you have a very small pantry of only a few shelves or a large walk-in pantry, after a year things will have gotten out of order and need organization.

Organize your pantry like a grocery store. Have all pastas and grains in one area. Put all canned goods in another area, separating vegetables, fruit, soups, etc. If you have more than one can of green beans or tomato soup, put the newer cans behind the older cans so that you rotate your food and use up the older cans first. While going through the process or organizing the cans and condiments, take a look at expiration or “best used by” dates. Discard cans that are past their expiration date and donate cans of items you bought some time ago but have no plan of using soon. This will open up your shelves for holiday shopping.

Think before you stock up on large quantities on a sale. Will you really use all those cans before they expire? Do you have space to store the cans in a usable manner? Are you saving enough money or time shopping by buying in bulk to make up for the inconvenience of cramming your shelves or having to look elsewhere to store the extras? Next year will you find 10 cans of pumpkin in your basement along with the 20 rolls of paper towels?

Once organized, you will be surprised at  how much space you now have for your holiday food shopping.

Jonda S. Beattie

Professional Organizer