Paper Management – Part 2: Filing

Try as hard as we can, we still have a lot of paper that comes into our homes. If we are not vigilant, it will stack up on our counters, tables, and desks. It will add clutter to our lives and it will be hard to locate that paper that is really important (I know my license renewal paperwork is in here somewhere).

Having a filing system that works for you is key to keeping those surfaces uncluttered.

Let’s start with setting up a desktop file or action file. This is where most of the current incoming paperwork will probably land. The concept is that each piece of paper requires an action even if that action is to throw it away. Your files will separate the papers by the action required. Likely file headings are “Pay”, ” Do”, “Contact”, “Pending”, “Read”, “File”. If you take all the paper that has come in this week, it should fit into one of the files. If you have something that does not fit there, ask yourself, “What action is necessary?” and make another file. The goal is to have no loose papers on any surfaces.

I usually have some projects that I am working on. These generate paper. I may have some research, a draft, or ideas for the projects. I use project bins for this type of paper. When I am working on the project, I pull out the papers and when my work time is up, I shove the papers back into the bin.

Then there are the other bits of paper we might keep that don’t fit into those categories. I have envelopes in my desk drawer for receipts that I need to keep. I have a plastic envelope in the kitchen for coupons I might use. I have files near my cookbooks for recipes. I have some files in my bookcase for special interests (exercise, landscaping, decorating).

I also have a file where I store all house related information, warranties and directions for household items.

Then we also have our permanent basic files where we keep our financial papers, insurance, vital records, medical records, tax papers and so forth. We also have files for archival papers such as past taxes, old property sales, bank records, military paperwork, or any paperwork that we rarely need but want to find if necessary. Archival files do not have to be handy so they can be stored in the top of a closet or in the attic.

The purpose of files is to keep paper from stacking up and to make paperwork easy to locate. The files should be easy to use and access or you will find yourself laying down that paper “just for now.”

Start with your most recent stacks of paper and see what action you need to take. Soon you will enjoy your open spaces on your surfaces that were once covered in paper.

Jonda S. Beattie

Professional Organizer

Zoning Your Office

Zoning your office can increase your efficiency. Organizing your office so that you have needed items at your fingertips can minimize the stress and frustration of not knowing where to locate that needed item immediately when you need it.
I recommend dividing your “office” into 4 zones. Some of the actual zones may not be in the same area as where you do your day in and day out work.

Zone 1: This is the zone that is right at your finger tips. You should be able to reach items in this zone without leaving your desk. In this zone you place the items you use everyday. Depending on what you do, a partial list could include:

  • computer
  • printer
  • phone
  • timer
  • pens/pencils
  • business cards
  • stapler
  • action files
  • current client files

Zone 2: This zone is close and accessibly. In this zone you place items you use weekly or at least often. A partial list might include:

  • reference books
  • 3 hole punch
  • extra paper for computer
  • label maker
  • extra file folders
  • manuals
  • file cabinet

Zone 3: This zone can be farther away and even in another room. In this zone you place items rarely needed. The list might include:

  • extra office supplies
  • extra business cards/marketing material
  • reference files
  • older client files
  • inspirational files
  • items needed for presentations or booths
  • rarely used references
  • last year’s financing papers

Zone 4: This zone definitely should not be taking up any prime real estate. In this zone you place purely archival information. This list would mainly be old tax papers and very old client records. This could be in a basement or attic. Just make certain to clearly label the boxes.

Share with me how you zone your office for efficiency.

Jonda S. Beattie
Professional Organizer